FAQ

Below are frequently asked questions about Beyond Exchange and it programs. Click on a specific question you would like the answer to or click on a category to view the questions and answers regarding that subject.

  Background

  Income / Benefits

  After Participant Arrive in the United States

After the program ends

Dependents


Background

What is an H3 Visa:
The H3 visa is a nonimmigrant visa, which allows foreign nationals to enter the U.S. to receive training in a U.S. company. However, you may not come for a graduate program or medical training, and the training cannot be available in the trainee's home country.

To qualify for H-3 visa, you must be coming to the U.S. to receive training in areas such as commerce, agriculture, government, professions, finance, agriculture, or in an industrial establishment. You must prove that:

  • You are not receiving graduate medical education or training in the U.S.
  • You do not have the opportunity to receive similar training in your home country.
  • You need this training to advance your career outside the U.S.
  • You will not be productively employed unless it is necessary to the training.
  • The training offered does not employ U.S. citizen and resident workers.

If you feel that you meet the above requirements, you can apply for employment with Beyond Management under this category, please click here to apply online.

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What is an H2B Visa:
The H2B working visa is a nonimmigrant visa, which allows foreign nationals to enter into the U.S. temporarily and engage in nonagricultural employment which is seasonal, intermittent, a peak load need, or a one-time occurrence. Beyond Exchange in collaboration with Beyond Management Inc. offers h2b visa to qualified workers in field of hospitality (housekeeping, room division, maintenance etc.). To apply, please click here.

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What is an H1B Visa:
The H1B Visa Program is the official and primary USA work visa / work permit. The US Government introduced the H1B visa to offer and enable highly skilled International Professionals and/or International Students, from all over the World, the opportunity to live and work in the USA. This visa is for maximum of three years with a three-year possible extension. Beyond Exchange offers this visa under its BESMP program. Please click here to apply now under this visa category.

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What is a Q-1 Visa:
Q-1 visa is a cultural exchange visa designed for foreign participants to share their country's history, culture and traditions with American Public via a structured cultural exchange program. BE offers this visa under its cultural exchange program in BEIP. Please click here to apply online for this program.

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What is a J-1 visa?
he J-1 visa is a cultural eWxchange visa. It is a tool of public diplomacy administered by the U.S. Department of State, and was developed to expose individuals from around the world to the culture and institutions of the United States and to foster a better understanding of the U.S. perspective on a variety of issues.

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What is the J-1 visa for training?
One of the 13 categories of J-1 visa is the "trainee" category. This cultural exchange visa is used to allow foreign students and professionals to train with a U.S.-based host organization for up to 18 months. The J-1 visa is used to encourage both public and private exchanges for the purpose of developing links between cultures and expanding international business skills.

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What is the J-1 visa for internships?
There are 14 categories of the J-1 visa, and intern is one of them. This cultural exchange visa is used to allow foreign students and recent graduates to train with a U.S.-based host organization for up to 12 months. You must be EITHER currently enrolled in and pursuing studies at a degree or certificate granting post-secondary academic institution OR graduated from such an institution no more than 12 months prior to your internship program start date.

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What is on-the-job training?
The labor market in the United States is very different from those of other nations. On-the-job training should not be compared to the "apprenticeship" that is practiced in many nations. Instead, on-the-job training is a less-structured approach to developing job skills and knowledge, one that puts the responsibility of learning on the individual. The focus of on-the-job training is "learning-by-doing." It is important for international participants to understand this difference, because it requires the participant to be an equal partner in the learning process. It might be useful to consider that the host employer provides the "classroom," the training plan, and the tools for learning that put the participant in the position to learn about a specific activity or industry. However, it is left up to the participant to be the proactive learner.

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What is the J-1 visa for summer work/travel?
Another one of the J-1 visa categories is the summer work travel category.  This category enables university-level students who are enrolled full-time in classes and will be returing to class full-time to come to the United States during their summer break to work and travel in the United States for up to four (4) months.

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What is Beyond Exchange's role in the visa process?
In most cases, Beyond Exchange will offer employment to participants under the umbrella of beyond Management Group and file the visa petitions directly with United States Citizenship and Immigration services. Upon approval of the petition, BE will send the appropriate documents to the participants so s/he can apply for the visa at US Consulate.

Beyond Exchange is not a J1 visa sponsor. In this case, Beyond Exchange will offer employment to qualified J1 participants and secure their J1 sponsorship with Department of State approved sponsors in the USA. Applicants can also secure their own J1 visa sponsorship after acceptance of employment from Beyond Management Inc.

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What documents will BEYOND EXCHANGE issue to applicants?
Depending upon visa category, Beyond Exchange will either send a Form I-797B issued by the USCIS known as approval notice or DS2019 issued by a DOS approved sponsor to the participant so they can apply for their visa at the nearest US Consulate in their Country of Residence.

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What is the Certificate of Eligibility (DS-2019) document or I797-B Notice?
DS2019 is a legal document, which is issued by designated J1 sponsor as a designated sponsor of the J-1 visa under the authority of the U.S. Department of State. The Certificate of Eligibility is the document that entitles and authorizes the exchange visitor participant to be at a workplace in the United States for on-the-job practical training, and to receive training wages for such activity. The Certificate of Eligibility is null and void if the exchange visitor does not obtain a J-1 visa from a U.S. Embassy or Consulate for entry to the United States and authorized non-immigrant status while in the United States. The application for the J-1 visa itself can only be made once the Certificate of Eligibility has been issued, and application must be made through a U.S. Embassy or Consulate overseas (preferably in the applicant's home country).

Form I797-B also known as Approval Notice is issued by USCIS after evaluating the petition filed by the sponsor and employer. This form will have the name of the participant, work authorization period and name of the sponsor/employer.

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Why is it necessary for applicants to register with BEYOND EXCHANGE's partner organizations?
Our partner organizations provide our international applicants with additional services. These services include: assistance with the visa process, in-country representation of BEYOND EXCHANGE to verify student status of applicants and confirm student credentials and identity. These partners also provide us with work permits and assistance for our American participants, as part of our reciprocal exchanges. Therefore, it is important for international applicants to register with these counterparts when appropriate.

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Can applicants change status form one visa to another?
In case of H3, H2B, H1B, and Q-1 visas, it is often allowed to change status from one category to another while reaming in the USA. Official approval solely lies on the discretion of USCIS.

In case of J-1 visa, since it is a non-immigrant visa which means that applicants must show ties to the home country.  If an applicant is in the U.S., BEYOND EXCHANGE requires applicants to return to the home country for at least ninety (90) days for every year or partial year that he/she has been in the U.S. During this time, the applicant should either work or attend classes related to the proposed training.  Upon prior approval, BEYOND EXCHANGE may make exceptions for those on B-1/B-2 visas and dependents of other visas subject to approval from J1 sponsor and USCIS.

BEYOND EXCHANGE is unable to make up any time lost during application for change of status for any visa whatsoever.

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How can I find out about changes in the regulations or processes that may affect my visa program? BEYOND EXCHANGE is constantly monitoring changes in the regulations that govern the visas, and communicates these changes through its Web site at http://www.BeyondExchange.org under News & Event section.

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Income/Benefits

Will I be paid overtime?
There are two types of positions in the United States: "exempt" or "non-exempt." Anyone deemed an "Exempt" employee will earn a set wage to perform a particular job, while "nonexempt" employees earn a wage for the actual time they work. The determination is based on the position, not the individual. Therefore, if U.S. employees are considered "exempt," then participants will be considered "exempt," and vice versa. U.S. employers are not required to pay overtime to "exempt" employees. On the other hand, participants who are considered "nonexempt" are eligible for overtime. Determination of overtime varies by employer and by state. Overtime is usually earned after 40 hours per week, and it is typically earned at 1-1/2 times base rate of pay. You need to carefully read the agreement that you sign with Beyond Exchange to verify your salary and benefit package.

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Can I get a bonus?
Yes. There are no regulations that prohibit participants from earning a bonus during their training or work program. Bonus is given based on your performance.

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Does Beyond Exchange have to provide the participant with paid vacation or paid sick leave during the training period?
No. American employers are not legally required to offer their employees any leave with pay, including vacation and sick time. Therefore, U.S. employers are not legally required to offer participants any type of leave with pay. Participants are subject to the leave policies of their actual work location and Beyond Management (The Employer). In most cases, participants will have to "earn" paid vacation and sick time. That is, participants will be eligible for paid leave only after spending a certain period of time with Beyond Management.

As a guide, in the United States, new employees typically earn one to two weeks of vacation in their second year of employment.

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Do participants have to pay taxes?
Participants who earn income from a U.S. source must pay federal and state income taxes. State income tax rates vary (and some states do not have an income tax), but the federal income tax is indexed by the level of the wage. Participants should expect to pay about 25 percent of their gross salary in federal income taxes. The employer will automatically deduct federal and state income taxes from the paycheck. Participants do not pay Social Security taxes (FICA) or Federal Unemployment tax (FUTA) because they are not eligible for these benefits.

In the case of H1B visa, since it's a dual intent visa, participants are also subject to pay Social Security taxes (FICA) and Federal Unemployment tax (FUTA).

In addition, participants whose training wages may be paid from an overseas source should also note that this income may be subject to tax, as well. How an individual performing services in the United States is taxed depends on his or her U.S. tax status  resident or nonresident. A non-immigrant is a resident if he or she has been physically present in the United States for 183 days or more, for any reason. A resident is subject to U.S. tax on worldwide income, regardless of the location of payment. Compensation for services performed in the United States is U.S. source income regardless of the location of payment, unless an exception applies.

Participants must file both a federal income tax return and a state income tax return (if there is a state income tax). These returns must be filed by April 15 for each year they earn income in the United States. For example, if the training program lasts from January 1, 2003, to July 2, 2004, participants will have to file tax returns for two years. In this example, participants must file the first return by April 15, 2004, for income earned in 2003, and must file the second return by April 15, 2005, by the income earned in 2004.

Participants will use either the form 1040NR-EZ or form 1040NR to file their federal tax return. These forms are available after January 1 at Internal Revenue Service (IRS) offices, at a local public library, or from the IRS Web site at www.irs.gov. Information for forms used to file tax returns for state income taxes can be found after January 1 at a local public library or from the state's Web site.

Some participants earning an income from a source not in the United States do not have to pay U.S. federal or state income taxes. However, they must still file a federal tax return each year they are earning income in the United States (the amount of income will be "$0"). Examples of this are students who receive grants from their home countries.

It is important to remember to file tax returns. In most cases, participants can expect to get a tax refund from the federal government. For more information about taxes, including tax treaties, program participants can review additional tax information located in BEYOND EXCHANGE's Web Community or visit www.irs.gov.

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Where can participants find information about taxes?
In addition to obtaining information from the tax information available on BEYOND EXCHANGE's Web Communities, they can view the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Web site at www.irs.gov/. The tax system in the United States in complicated. Because it is impossible to take into account all of the factors involved, it will not be easy to obtain information and advice from others about a personal tax situation.

You may wish to check with Tax Back International, a company specializing in assisting foreign nationals with filing U.S. income taxes. Tax Back International can be contacted for free advice through a toll-free phone number in the U.S. at 1.888.203.8900 or via their Web site at www.taxback.com .

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Can participants work a second job?
No. Work visas for on-the-job training or specialty and/or seasonal employment allows participants to legally earn a wage only from the employer listed on the visa. Participants cannot legally earn a wage at any other employer during their training program, and would not be authorized to be at a workplace other than the one for which the training/work program is approved, as indicated on the Certificate of Eligibility or Form I-797B.

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Can a spouse work?
This varies depending upon the visa you are on. H visa depends who enter the USA on H4 visa are not allowed to work.

However upon arriving in the United States, a dependent spouse who has a valid J-2 visa is able to apply for work authorization through the Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Dependents on a J-2 visa are eligible to apply for the Employment Authorization Document (EAD) under the provisions of Category 274a.12(c).

When making application, the most important thing to show is that the J-2 dependent spouse does not need to work to financially support the J-1 visa participant.

Please note that BEYOND EXCHANGE can offer paid legal assistance to the J-2 dependent spouse's application for work authorization.

The time it takes for USCIS to process an application for work authorization varies considerably depending on the region of the United States in which the application is processed. J-2 dependent spouses should expect at least a 60-day wait for employment authorization. Such an application is usually made on Form I-765 along with the appropriate application fee and a statement of family expenses. The most up-to-date information on filing fees and where to file the Form I-765 can be found on the USCIS Web site. The statement of family expenses may include customary recreational and cultural activities and related travel. The Form I-94 of the participant and the Form I-94 of the family member applying for work permission should be submitted with the I-765 Form. Action taken by USCIS on the application will be noted on the back of the dependent's Form I-94, which will be returned to the applicant. If permission for employment is granted, it is valid for any kind of employment without limitation as to full time or part time. Work permission for a J-2 dependent expires at the same time as the authorized stay noted on the J-1 visa holder's Certificate of Eligibility.

Although Social Security and federal unemployment taxes are not deducted from the earnings of a J-1 participant, they are deducted from the earnings of J-2 dependents, because their services are not performed "to carry out a purpose for which the individual was admitted." Therefore, J-2 dependents are subject to Social Security and federal unemployment taxes, federal income taxes, and, where applicable, state and local income taxes.

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How do participants use their health insurance?
Please see the Health Insurance Information Guide for more detailed information. Participants should always carry the health insurance card with them. If participants are in an accident or need medical attention unexpectedly, they will need to show proof of coverage under a health insurance policy. Except in potentially life threatening medical emergencies, clinics, doctors, and hospitals will ask to see the health insurance card before treatment is administered.

Procedures for payment of medical treatment vary, but participants should expect to have at least some out-of-pocket costs for each medical treatment they receive.

Please note that pregnancy is NOT covered by the BEYOND EXCHANGE-provided medical insurance policy which is included in the Program Fee. Any pregnancy-related medical expenses would be incurred at the expense of the participant and/or spouse.

If you are enrolled in Beyond Exchange's Insurance Policy, please click here to enter Insurance Resources.

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What happens if a child is born to a participant during the program?
All children born to a participant in a BEYOND EXCHANGE program during his or her visa program must be covered by a valid health insurance policy within 30 days of the birth of the child. Dependent children can be enrolled into the health insurance program offered by BEYOND EXCHANGE at an additional cost, or they must be enrolled into a health insurance policy that meets the minimum requirements established by the U.S. Department of State.

Children born in the United States are considered to be citizens of the United States. Participants who wish to maintain their children's U.S. citizenship should arrange to obtain a U.S. passport for children born in the United States prior to the end of their J-1 program.

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After Participants Arrive in the United States

Who is the sponsor when participants are in the United States?
In most cases BEYOND Management Inc. is the legal sponsor and employer on H2B, H3 and H1B visas.
In case of Q-1 and J1 visas, Beyond Exchange may work with other sponsors and employers. In that case we will advise you of the name of your legal visa sponsor at the time you apply for your appropriate visa with US Consulate abroad.

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How do I contact BEYOND EXCHANGE?
Contact BEYOND EXCHANGE by telephone at 888-806 8490 or 770-804 6461, by mail at 3939E LaVista Road # 341 Tucker, GA 30084, or by e-mail at info@beyondmanagement.org. BEYOND EXCHANGE staff travel throughout the United States during the year. Check the BEYOND EXCHANGE Web site at www.BeyondExchange.org/events for information on events in nearby cities.

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What do participants do when they first arrive in the United States?
Pre-arrival information must be sent via Beyond Exchange's online program. All arrival guidelines must be reviewed by the participant prior to arriving. It is Participant's responsibility to make sure that he has arrival guidelines from Beyond Exchange prior to leaving from her/his home Country. Participants must contact BEYOND EXCHANGE to confirm the date of arrival, and must provide BEYOND EXCHANGE with the current address, telephone number and e-mail address within 10 days of arrival. In J1 visa, J1 sponsor must confirm arrival with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) within 30 days of the date listed in line #3 of the Form DS-2019, otherwise J1 Sponsor will be forced to withdraw sponsorship.

Participants who do not have a Social Security number will need to apply for one in order to be added to the payroll. See information below about applying for a Social Security card. Make sure to bring proof of identity, as well as the I-94 card and the Form DS-2019 or form I-797B. On the first day of the program, the participants will be asked to complete an I-9 form and W-4 form in order to get enrolled onto the payroll. Make sure to bring the Form I797B and DS-2019. Please see instructions herein for information on paying taxes.

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What documents must participants have with them all the time?
Participants should always carry their I-94 card and the Form DS-2019 (If on J1 Visa) or form I797B (If on H or Q visa). The I-94 card is the document that confirms participants have legally entered the United States. The Form DS-2019 is the document that confirms that participants are in the United States legally on a J-1 visa, Form I797B confirms that participants are legally employed by Beyond Management on a valid work visa and entitled to be at a work place. Therefore, it is important that participants have both documents with them at all times so they can prove they are legally in the United States on visa.

Please make a copy of your passport and visa page and keep it with you. However it is advised that you keep your passport locked in a safe place.

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How do participants apply for a Social Security number/card?
If participants do not have a U.S. Social Security number, they will have to apply for a Social Security card. They will need to travel to the local office of the Social Security Administration (SSA). These are located in major cities, as well as in the county seats of all U.S. counties. Participants can find address information from the "blue pages" in their local telephone book or by searching the Internet at www.ssa.gov.

Participants must carry their passport, the I-94 card, Letter of employment (From Beyond Management) and the Form DS-2019 (if on J1 Visa) with them for identification purposes. They should also bring the copy of their birth certificate in case the SSA needs to further confirm their identity. Participants will complete an application for a Social Security card and will have to show these documents to prove their identity.

Participants should prepare to spend at least one hour applying for their Social Security card. Depending on the number of people who have come to the office on that day, participants will likely find a long line of customers in front of them. (The Social Security Administration manages benefits to senior citizens, persons with disabilities, and those individuals who rely on publicly funded health insurance.) Participants will likely be asked to take a number and wait for the number to be called. Once called, participants will submit their application and show their I-94 card and Form DS-2019. The customer service agent will make copies of these forms, and return the original copies. Participants SHOULD NOT leave the original of the I-94 card or the Form DS-2019 with the customer service agent.

For security purposes, the customer service agent is required to confirm participants arrival information in the Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) database, which receives information from the Department of Homeland Security. Once an applicant is verified in this database, the Social Security Administration can process that individual's application. Participants will get a receipt indicating that they have applied for the Social Security card, and that they will receive the card within two to four weeks.

If the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has been slow to update its records, the customer service agent may not be able to confirm the information. In that case, participants will be given a receipt that they have applied for a Social Security card, but that the Social Security Administration was not able to confirm their security clearance. The Social Security Administration will have to make a formal inquiry to DHS about their records, a process that can take four to six weeks.

Participants can be added to their host employer's payroll without a Social Security number. They can show the receipt of having applied for the card, and the host employer will be able to use a "dummy number" to enroll them on the payroll until they get their number. Participants must give their host employer their Social Security number as soon as they know it.

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Do participants need a Social Security number in order to begin their training?
No. Participants can be added to their host organization's payroll without a Social Security number. They can show the receipt of having applied for the card, and the host organization will be able to use a "dummy number" to enroll them on the payroll until they get their number. Participants must give their host organization their Social Security number as soon as they receive it.

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Can participants change their location of training/worksite?
No. Information about participants location of training is listed on their Form DS-2019 or at I-797B. As applicants are entering the United States for on-the-job training or work in a specific field at a specific location, they will not able to change training locations. If financial or other conditions with the training/work location change dramatically during the training program, participants must contact BEYOND EXCHANGE in order to determine if arrangements can be made to allow them to secure training at a different site. However, as the visa sponsor, only BEYOND EXCHANGE or in case of J1 only the official J1 Sponsor can make a decision on a change in training location.

It is important to remember that participants can legally earn a wage only at the employer listed on the Form DS-2019 or I797B. Substantial penalties exist for both the employer and the participant if the participant is not legally authorized to earn a wage at that employer.

*Under some of the BEYOND EXCHANGE programs, it is acceptable for participants to take second jobs as long as BEYOND EXCHANGE is notified of the change and second job is also at Beyond's managed location.

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What if a participant loses his or her I797B or Certificate of Eligibility (DS-2019)?
Participants should contact BEYOND EXCHANGE immediately. BEYOND EXCHANGE will contact the program sponsor or USCIS and request issuance of a new Form I-797B or DS-2019 for a small administrative charge. They must always carry this document with them.

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What if a participant loses his or her I-94 card?
Participants must apply to the Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services for a new I-94 card. It is important to remember that the I-94 card is the document that the U.S. government uses to determine that participants legally entered the United States. Without this card, participants have no proof that they have legally entered the United States, and will be subject to deportation. To obtain a replacement card, participants will complete and submit the I-102 form to USCIS. They will be asked to pay a fee to replace a lost I-94 card. Participants should also contact BEYOND EXCHANGE immediately to inform us that they have lost their I-94 card.

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What if a participant loses his or her passport?
Participants passports are a valuable form of identification, and, if lost or stolen, can be used by someone else. Passports will also contain participants J-1 visas issued by the U.S. Embassy or Consulate (except for Canadian citizens). Participants should immediately contact the nearest embassy or consulate of their country of citizenship located in the U.S. to inquire about applying for a replacement passport. Participants will be able to obtain new passports while remaining in the United States.

Please note that if participants travel outside of the United States (including Canada and Mexico) after they have obtained a replacement passport, they must obtain a new US Visa before they will be allowed to re-enter the United States (because their new passport will not have the specific visa in it).

If the I-94 card was inside the lost passport, participants must remember that they will have to apply for a replacement I-94 card (see above). If the Form DS-2019 or Form I797B was inside the lost passport, participants must remember that they will have to obtain a replacement Form DS-2019 or I797B by contacting BEYOND EXCHANGE.

Participants should contact BEYOND EXCHANGE immediately to notify us that they have lost their passport.

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Can participants travel outside the United States during the training/work program?
Participants are able to travel outside of the United States during the training/work program for up to 30 consecutive days. If on J1 visa, before they travel, participants must send the Form DS-2019 to BEYOND EXCHANGE so it can be forwarded to the sponsor for a signature. The signature confirms that the participant continues to be, and they should not be questioned at the border when returning. The signature is valid for one year.

You must have a valid multiple entry visa in your passport to re-enter the United States. If you have a single entry visa, or if your visa has expired, contact BEYOND EXCHANGE well in advance of your trip so that necessary documentation can be provided.

When traveling to Canada or Mexico for less than 30 days, participants do not surrender the I-94 card at the border. Participants can keep the card and show it to the border official when they return.

It is important for participants to make sure they can enter Canada or Mexico without a visa. Remember that the most US visas are only valid for the United States. And, while U.S. citizens do not need a visa to visit Canada or Mexico, the participant's home country may have separate visa requirements for travel into Mexico or Canada.

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Can dependents travel outside of the United States during the training/work program?
Yes. Dependents may travel in and out of the United States during the training program. It is strongly recommended that each dependent have his or her own passport.

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What if a participant changes his or her home address?
It is imperative that BEYOND EXCHANGE maintain an accurate, current home address for all participants in the United States.  Participants must notify BEYOND EXCHANGE of any address changes within 10 business days, or risk losing visa status. Participants can login to Beyond Exchange's website and enter their current home address anytime during their enrolment in Beyond's programs.

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How should a participant notify BEYOND EXCHANGE that he or she has moved to a different address, or if he or she has a different telephone number or e-mail address?
Participants can login to Beyond Exchange's website and enter their current home address anytime during their enrolment in Beyond's programs. Our online system will upodate your address in our files. However if you are on H1B visa, USCIS requires you to also change the address with them witin 10 days. To change your address with USCIS, please visit www.uscis.gov. You must change your address with Beyond Management and USCIS.

Eventhough its not recommended, participants can also change their address by contacting BEYOND EXCHANGE by telephone at 888-806 8490 or 770-804 6461, by mail at 3939E LaVista Road # 341 Tucker, GA 30084, or by e-mail at info@beyondmanagement.org. BEYOND EXCHANGE staff travel throughout the United States during the year. Check the BEYOND EXCHANGE Web site at www.BeyondExchange.org and click on News for information on events in nearby cities.

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After the Program Ends

How long can participants stay in the United States after the training/work program?
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) requires participants to leave USA as soon as their I94 expires. However on J1 and Q1 visas DHS currently allows individuals to legally remain in the United States for 30 days after the end date indicated on their DS-2019 (Certificate of Eligibility) and I797B. It is very important to comply with this regulation. If a participant's training program ends before the end date indicated on the DS-2019, he or she should contact BEYOND EXCHANGE. Anyone who remains in the United States beyond their legal status, even for one day, is subject to stiff penalties if the individual ever wants to return to the United States.

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Can a participant stay in the United States as a tourist after his or her training/work program?
Yes. If a participant wants to travel around the United States for more than 30 days after his or her training/work program has been completed, he or she can apply to the Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for a change of status to a B1/B-2 Visitor's visa. This will allow the participant to extend his or her stay in the United States. The participant must apply for this change of status before the last day of his or her training/work program that is noted on the Form I797B or DS-2019. Please note that the participant cannot remain on the payroll of his or her employer beyond the last day of the training or work program that is noted on the Form DS-2019 or Form I797B. Substantial penalties exist for both the participant and the employer if he or she is not legally authorized to earn a wage at that employer.

Beyond Exchange can assists participants to extend their stay to B1/B2 for a nominal fee plus the USCIS extension of stay fee payable to Department of Homeland Security.

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Can a participant change status from one visa to another visa, such as an H-1B visa, at the end of the program?
Most work and training visas on exception of H1B are non-immigrant visas, which means that participants are supposed to leave the U.S. at the end of the program.  As part of BEYOND EXCHANGE's sponsorship, the participants sign the obligations and responsibilities form confirming that the participant intends to enter the United States for practical training or one time work and do not intend to abandon their non-immigrant status.
However USCIS and DHS allows certain non-immigrants to change their status from one visa to another. Please contact Beyond Exchange to find out if your situation allows you to change or extend your training or work visa. The participants must apply for their change of status before the last day of their training/work program that is noted on the Form I797B or DS-2019 form. Participants can also request change of status by logging in to their accounts on our website at www.beyondexchange.org.

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Can a participant have a similar visa for second time e.g. J1/Q1 or H1B?
Yes, under certain conditions. For trainees, interns, and workers additional training and internship programs must address the development of more advanced skills or a different field of expertise. Interns may participate in additional internship programs as long as they maintain student status or begin a new internship program within 12 months of graduation. Trainees are eligible for additional training programs after a period of at least two years residency outside the United States, following their initial training program. Summer work and travel participants may take part in that program for as many summers as they like, as long as they are enrolled full-time in post-secondary education.

H1B workers can obtain new H1B visa after completing six years on previous one if they remain outside of the USA for one complete year. Sam applies for Q1 non-immigrant workers. H2B workers can continue to come back to work on seasonal jobs season after season.

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Can someone participate in a training program right after an internship?
No. Participants who have successfully completed an internship program and no longer meet the selection criteria for internship programs have to reside outside of the United States for two years before they can apply for a training position.

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Can a participant extend his or her training/work program?
The maximum time allowed on H1B visa is six years. Participants can get extension for another three years before their first three years end. H2B visas are mostly for seasonal jobs so extensions are not possible. However workers can come back for another season by contacting beyond Exchange well in advance.
The maximum time allowed on the J-1 visa for on-the-job training is 18 months. The maximum time allowed on the J-1 Intern visa is 12 months. If a participant has entered the United States for a six-month program, and he or she and the host employer find it would be valuable for him or her to continue the training program for another 12 months, BEYOND EXCHANGE can request the sponsor to process an extension to the program.
Please note that BEYOND EXCHANGE charges a fee to extend a program, and requires submission of a training plan or other documents for the extension period of the program. The extension approval period may take 2-3 weeks on J1 and longer on other visas, therefore please plan accordingly to apply for an extension in advance of the original program end date. Please contact BEYOND EXCHANGE at info@beyondexchange.org for information on how to request an extension or simply login to your account and apply for extension there.

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Dependents

Who is considered an eligible dependent?
Dependents must be spouses or children of the J-1/H2B/H1B/H3 visa holder. Common law marriages are not recognized and are not eligible for dependent visas.

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What happens if a child is born to a participant during the J-1 program?
The BEYOND EXCHANGE health insurance policy does not cover pregnancy. If a participant decides to remain in the United States while pregnant, they will have to pay for all the medical care themselves, which can be very expensive.

All children born to participants in a BEYOND EXCHANGE program must be covered by a valid health insurance policy (if on J1) within 30 days of the birth of the child. Dependent children can be enrolled into the health insurance program offered by BEYOND EXCHANGE at an additional cost, or they must be enrolled into a health insurance policy that meets the minimum requirements established by the U.S. Department of State.

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Can dependents travel outside the United States during the training program?
Yes. Dependents may travel in and out of the United States during the training program. They too will need to get a signature on their DS-2019 from (if on J1 or J2 visa) BEYOND EXCHANGE before they travel. Please refer to the above question for details. It is strongly recommended that each dependent have his or her own passport.

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Can the spouse of a participant work?
This varies depending upon the visa you are on. H visa depends who enter the USA on H4 visa are not allowed to work.

However upon arriving in the United States, a dependent spouse who has a valid J-2 visa is able to apply for work authorization through the Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Dependents on a J-2 visa are eligible to apply for the Employment Authorization Document (EAD) under the provisions of Category 274a.12(c).

When making application, the most important thing to show is that the J-2 dependent spouse does not need to work to financially support the J-1 visa participant.

Please note that BEYOND EXCHANGE can offer paid legal assistance to the J-2 dependent spouse's application for work authorization.

The time it takes for USCIS to process an application for work authorization varies considerably depending on the region of the United States in which the application is processed. J-2 dependent spouses should expect at least a 60-day wait for employment authorization. Such an application is usually made on Form I-765 along with the appropriate application fee and a statement of family expenses. The most up-to-date information on filing fees and where to file the Form I-765 can be found on the USCIS Web site. The statement of family expenses may include customary recreational and cultural activities and related travel. The Form I-94 of the participant and the Form I-94 of the family member applying for work permission should be submitted with the I-765 Form. Action taken by USCIS on the application will be noted on the back of the dependent's Form I-94, which will be returned to the applicant. If permission for employment is granted, it is valid for any kind of employment without limitation as to full time or part time. Work permission for a J-2 dependent expires at the same time as the authorized stay noted on the J-1 visa holder's Certificate of Eligibility.

Although Social Security and federal unemployment taxes are not deducted from the earnings of a J-1 participant, they are deducted from the earnings of J-2 dependents, because their services are not performed "to carry out a purpose for which

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